Jackie Felix

Jackie Felix in her studio.

Jackie Felix in her studio.

Jackie Felix is an artist whose works I have admired for quite sometime.   She draws and paints (primarily figuratively) and, in spite of personal obstacles, has been a working artist her entire life.   Her work always feels fresh, socially relevant.  And while unflinching in thematic content, it can be subtle in it’s execution and depiction of contemporary and sometimes difficult subject matter.

But my admiration for her extends far beyond her artwork.  She is not only an uncompromising artist, she is a brave woman with a fearless intellectual spirit.  Speaking with her is always a pleasure for me because no matter the original reason for the conversation, the exchange invariably meanders into thought provoking and fascinating territory.  These conversations are almost always about art but refreshingly within the context of being a conscious human or citizen of the world.   Jackie in studioOften, politics, religion and sex come up but in an intellectually comfortable zone.   She makes important connections between all these topics and you become hip-deep in these conversations before you even know it.   Not surprisingly, this is also how she describes her creative process  -  that there is always a connecting thread between themes from one body of work to the next.   After a conversation with her,  I am always grateful because I invariably learn something substantial from this accomplished woman.  But above all, I enjoy speaking with her because it is always personal and real.

As a young girl growing up in Pittsburgh, it is more than safe to say she was not encouraged to develop her obvious artistic talents.  This was a time when women had few career options.   You were encouraged to be a secretary, a nurse or a teacher.  Very few women received a college education at that time let alone were encouraged to pursue a career as an artist.

Jackie Felix, Some More Happiness: Winter's End, acrylic & gesso, 2008-2009

Jackie Felix, Some More Happiness: Winter's End, acrylic & gesso, 2008-2009

As many in her generation, Jackie married and had children but continued to create.   After the loss of her first husband in a car accident, she remarried and remains married to her current husband, Al.   They both raised their respective children together and it is through the support she received in this relationship, that she was finally able to fully pursue her artistic career.

As with her work, Jackie has become a common “connector” to many within her artistic community.  Scratch the surface and you will find that almost everyone knows her or has been influenced or nurtured in one way or another by her.   She has been a consistent supporter of the community and has been a great friend to many.  But her art work speaks for itself.   It somehow unconsciously engages and connects us to the human condition.  It speaks to how we interact – or not – with each other and with the contemporary world we inhabit.

We interviewed Jackie earlier this year.  You can check out the interview and transcript under our Interview posts.

If you want to see more of her work, go to her website at www.jackie-felix.com.

Jackie Felix in her studio.

Jackie Felix in her studio.

Watch the video and read the transcript here.

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Bruce Adams &
Richard Huntington

Bruce Adams and Richard Huntington in their studio.

Bruce Adams and Richard Huntington in their studio.

Featured Artists: Bruce Adams and Richard Huntington

Bruce Adams and Richard Huntington have been creating artworks their entire lives. Both are primarily figurative painters. But any similarity between these two seems to end there. Their respective approaches to art making couldn’t be more disparate. And, they admit to having many debates about these differences. Still, they have shared a studio space for fifteen years and have remained good friends throughout that time.

"Self–Expression Based on Inside–Out W/ Inside Priveledged" by Bruce Adams

Self-expression Based on Inside-Outside w/ Inside Priveledged By Bruce Adams

Bruce has been primarily a painter most of his life and has taught art at the high school level for over twenty years (www.adams-studio.com).  His work is informed by post modern and experimental arts through exposure to conceptual artists from all over the world primarily by his involvement with alternative arts organizations such as Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center.  In recent years, he has  also been an arts writer and reviewer for which he has received some pointers from studio-mate and friend, Richard Huntington.


"Whereabouts Unknown: Erich Heckel: Bildnis der Schwester"  acrylic/pencil, 2002. By Richard Huntington

Whereabouts Unknown: Heckel By Richard Huntington

Richard is a painter and printmaker.  He was also the art critic for the Buffalo News for over twenty years where he covered local and regional venues, as well as in museums and galleries in Toronto, New York City, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, London, Berlin, and Venice.  His articles have appeared in such art periodicals as ArtNews, High Performance Magazine, and Art New England.   Not surprisingly, his approach to art making is quite different form his studio-mate’s.

Enjoy the lively interview with them recorded as a companion piece to an exhibition of their works, Studio Secrets Revealed: Works by Bruce Adams and Richard Huntington at the Carnegie Art Center in the fall of 2008.   The exhibit was curated by former Executive Director, Ellen Ryan.


Watch Bruce Adams' interview

Watch Bruce Adams interview

Watch Richard Huntington interview

Watch Richard Huntington interview

Watch the entire interview and read the Transcript.

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